Philo On the Confusion of Tongues 146

Classical

146 And even if there be not as yet any one who is worthy to be called a son of God, nevertheless let him labour earnestly to be adorned according to his first-born word, the eldest of his angels, as the great archangel of many names; for he is called, the authority, and the name of God, and the Word, and man according to God's image, and he who sees Israel. 147 For which reason I was induced a little while ago to praise the principles of those who said, "We are all one man's Sons." For even if we are not yet suitable to be called the sons of God, still we may deserve to be called the children of his eternal image, of his most sacred word; for the image of God is his most ancient word. Source

Date: 20-50 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

John 1:3

New Testament

1 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was fully God. 2 The Word was with God in the beginning. 3 All things were created by him, and apart from him not one thing was created that has been created. 4 In him was life, and the life was the light of mankind. 5 And the light shines on in the darkness, but the darkness has not mastered it. Source

Date: 90-110 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... The Logos: According to the well-known words of John 1, "in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God . . . and through him (the Word) all things came into being" (vv. 1, 3). Interpreters have frequently appealed to Philo's use of Word (or Logos) for aid in understanding the background against which the Johannine Prologue should be understood. According to these opening verses the Word is from the beginning, in God's presence, is in some sense to be identified with God, and is the agent of creation ... These ideas are not only relevant to the Johannine Logos, but significantly contribute to the background of other christological confessions in the NT ..."

Evans, Craig A. Ancient Texts for New Testament Studies: A Guide to the Background Literature (p. 170) Hendrickson Publishers, 2005

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... The Logos: According to the well-known words of John 1, "in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God . . . and through him (the Word) all things came into being" (vv. 1, 3). Interpreters have frequently appealed to Philo's use of Word (or Logos) for aid in understanding the background against which the Johannine Prologue should be understood. According to these opening verses the Word is from the beginning, in God's presence, is in some sense to be identified with God, and is the agent of creation ... These ideas are not only relevant to the Johannine Logos, but significantly contribute to the background of other christological confessions in the NT ..."

Evans, Craig A. Ancient Texts for New Testament Studies: A Guide to the Background Literature (p. 170) Hendrickson Publishers, 2005

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.