Psalm 9:6

Hebrew Bible

4 For you defended my just cause; from your throne you pronounced a just decision. 5 You terrified the nations with your battle cry. You destroyed the wicked; you permanently wiped out all memory of them. 6 The enemy’s cities have been reduced to permanent ruins. You destroyed their cities; all memory of the enemies has perished. 7 But the Lord rules forever; he reigns in a just manner. 8 He judges the world fairly; he makes just legal decisions for the nations. Source

Date: 6th-3rd Centuries B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

LXX Psalm 9:6

Septuagint

5 For thou hast maintained my cause and my right; thou satest on the throne, that judgest righteousness. 6 Thou hast rebuked the nations, and the ungodly one has perished; thou hast blotted out their name for ever, even for ever and ever. 7 The swords of the enemy have failed utterly; and thou hast destroyed cities: their memorial has been destroyed with a noise, 8 but the Lord endures for ever: he has prepared his throne for judgment. 9 And he will judge the world in righteousness, he will judge the nations in uprightness. Source

Date: 1st Century B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... It has been suggested that the translator of Psalms evaded the idea that God himself destroyed the wicked, and that he therefore changed the original text by reading the letters differently from MT (עשרה דַבָא). However, if this were true, he would have been inconsistent for elsewhere in the LXX of Psalms God is pictured as personally destroying the wicked (Ps 5:6–7; 143(142):12). It is therefore more likely that the difference between MT and the LXX is based not on the translator’s tendentious change, but on variants that underlie the translation."

Tov, Emanuel The Text-Critical use of the Septuagint in Biblical Research (p. 112) Eisenbrauns, 2015

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... It has been suggested that the translator of Psalms evaded the idea that God himself destroyed the wicked, and that he therefore changed the original text by reading the letters differently from MT (עשרה דַבָא). However, if this were true, he would have been inconsistent for elsewhere in the LXX of Psalms God is pictured as personally destroying the wicked (Ps 5:6–7; 143(142):12). It is therefore more likely that the difference between MT and the LXX is based not on the translator’s tendentious change, but on variants that underlie the translation."

Tov, Emanuel The Text-Critical use of the Septuagint in Biblical Research (p. 112) Eisenbrauns, 2015

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.