Polybius Histories 4.1

Classical

In my former book I explained the causes of the second war between Rome and Carthage; and described Hannibal’s invasion of Italy, and the engagements which took place between them up to the battle of Cannae, on the banks of the Aufidus. I shall now take up the history of Greece during the same period, ending at the same date, and commencing from the 140th Olympiad. But I shall first recall to the recollection of my readers what I stated in my second book on the subject of the Greeks, and especially of the Achaeans; for the league of the latter has made extraordinary progress up to our own age and the generation immediately preceding. Source

Date: 140-120 B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

Acts 1:1

New Testament

1 I wrote the former account, Theophilus, about all that Jesus began to do and teach 2 until the day he was taken up to heaven, after he had given orders by the Holy Spirit to the apostles he had chosen. 3 To the same apostles also, after his suffering, he presented himself alive with many convincing proofs. He was seen by them over a forty-day period and spoke about matters concerning the kingdom of God. 4 While he was with them, he declared, “Do not leave Jerusalem, but wait there for what my Father promised, which you heard about from me. 5 For John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now.” Source

Date: 75-85 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

Wright, N.T. & Bird, Michael F. The New Testament in Its World: An Introduction to the History, Literature, and Theology of the First Christians (p. 618) Zondervan Academic, 2019

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

Wright, N.T. & Bird, Michael F. The New Testament in Its World: An Introduction to the History, Literature, and Theology of the First Christians (p. 618) Zondervan Academic, 2019

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.