Mark 12:37

New Testament

35 While Jesus was teaching in the temple courts, he said, “How is it that the experts in the law say that the Christ is David’s son? 36 David himself, by the Holy Spirit, said, “‘The Lord said to my lord, “Sit at my right hand, until I put your enemies under your feet.”’ 37 If David himself calls him ‘Lord,’ how can he be his son?” And the large crowd was listening to him with delight. 38 In his teaching Jesus also said, “Watch out for the experts in the law. They like walking around in long robes and elaborate greetings in the marketplaces, 39 and the best seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at banquets. Source

Date: 60-75 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

Romans 1:3

New Testament

1 From Paul, a slave of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God. 2 This gospel he promised beforehand through his prophets in the holy scriptures, 3 concerning his Son who was a descendant of David with reference to the flesh, 4 who was appointed the Son-of-God-in-power according to the Holy Spirit by the resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord. 5 Through him we have received grace and our apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith among all the Gentiles on behalf of his name. Source

Date: 55-58 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... It is not enough, however, to say that Mark preserves a historical memory of Jesus challenging the notion of the Davidic sonship of the Messiah yet wants to affirm the post-Easter tendency to see Jesus as the Son of David. How and why does Mark put these two contradictory impulses together? Probably along the lines suggested by Romans 1:2-4: Jesus is not (just) the Son of David but (also) the Son of God. This harmonistic solution that we earlier rejected as an interpretation of our passage in its immediate context, then, is probably the right exegesis of it in its Markan context..."

Marcus, Joel "Identity and Ambiguity in Markan Christology" in Gaventa, Beverly Roberts, and Richard B. Hays, ed. Seeking the Identity of Jesus: A Pilgrimage (p. 139-140) William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2008

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... It is not enough, however, to say that Mark preserves a historical memory of Jesus challenging the notion of the Davidic sonship of the Messiah yet wants to affirm the post-Easter tendency to see Jesus as the Son of David. How and why does Mark put these two contradictory impulses together? Probably along the lines suggested by Romans 1:2-4: Jesus is not (just) the Son of David but (also) the Son of God. This harmonistic solution that we earlier rejected as an interpretation of our passage in its immediate context, then, is probably the right exegesis of it in its Markan context..."

Marcus, Joel "Identity and Ambiguity in Markan Christology" in Gaventa, Beverly Roberts, and Richard B. Hays, ed. Seeking the Identity of Jesus: A Pilgrimage (p. 139-140) William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2008

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.