LXX Psalm 28:3

Septuagint

1 Bring to the Lord, ye sons of God, bring to the Lord young rams; bring to the Lord glory and honour. 2 Bring to the Lord glory, due to his name; worship the Lord in his holy court. 3 The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory has thundered: the Lord is upon many waters. 4 The voice of the Lord is mighty; the voice of the Lord is full of majesty. 5 There is the voice of the Lord who breaks the cedars; the Lord will break the cedars of Libanus. Source

Date: 1st Century B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

Revelation 10:3

New Testament

1 Then I saw another powerful angel descending from heaven, wrapped in a cloud, with a rainbow above his head; his face was like the sun, and his legs were like pillars of fire. 2 He held in his hand a little scroll that was open, and he put his right foot on the sea and his left on the land. 3 Then he shouted in a loud voice like a lion roaring, and when he shouted, the seven thunders sounded their voices. 4 When the seven thunders spoke, I was preparing to write, but just then I heard a voice from heaven say, “Seal up what the seven thunders spoke and do not write it down.” 5 Then the angel I saw standing on the sea and on the land raised his right hand to heaven Source

Date: 92-96 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... In the New Testament Rev. 10.2-4 appears to be familiar with the LXX rendering of Ps. 28(29). (Cambe, ‘L’interprétation’, pp. 228–29), as does Acts 2 (Sailhamer, Translational Technique, p. 1). The ongoing interpretation of the Psalms can be traced through many church fathers too (Holladay, Psalms). A significant influence of the Psalms, however, is the way that its distinctive language has influenced later Christian vocabulary."

Aitken, James K. "Psalms" in Aitken, J. K., editor. T&T Clark Companion to the Septuagint (p. 330) T&T Clark International, 2015

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... In the New Testament Rev. 10.2-4 appears to be familiar with the LXX rendering of Ps. 28(29). (Cambe, ‘L’interprétation’, pp. 228–29), as does Acts 2 (Sailhamer, Translational Technique, p. 1). The ongoing interpretation of the Psalms can be traced through many church fathers too (Holladay, Psalms). A significant influence of the Psalms, however, is the way that its distinctive language has influenced later Christian vocabulary."

Aitken, James K. "Psalms" in Aitken, J. K., editor. T&T Clark Companion to the Septuagint (p. 330) T&T Clark International, 2015

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.