Job 42:17

Hebrew Bible

15 Nowhere in all the land could women be found who were as beautiful as Job’s daughters, and their father granted them an inheritance alongside their brothers. 16 After this Job lived 140 years; he saw his children and their children to the fourth generation. 17 And so Job died, old and full of days. Source

Date: 5th Century B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

LXX Job 42:17

Septuagint

15 And there were not found in comparison with the daughters of Job, fairer women than they in all the world: and their father gave them an inheritance among their brethren. 16 And Job lived after his affliction a hundred and seventy years: and all the years he lived were two hundred and forty: and Job saw his sons and his sons' sons, the fourth generation. 17 And Job died, an old man and full of days: 18 and it is written that he will rise again with those whom the Lord raises up. 19 This man is described in the Syriac book as living in the land of Ausis, on the borders of Idumea and Arabia: and his name before was Jobab; Source

Date: 1st Century B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... This passage proves significant both as a Septuagintal addition to the book of Job and as a Hellenistic Jewish interpretation of Job. On the one hand, it represents one of several additions in LXX Job, including the speech of Job's wife in 2:9, the identification of his friends as kings in 2:11, and the assertion of his resurrection in 49:17a.4 The fact that this passage was appended to the Greek translation of Job may point to an attitude toward this text as not completely fixed in its written form."

Reed, Annette Y. Job as Jobab: The Interpretation of Job in LXX Job 42:17b–e (pp. 31-55) Journal of Biblical Literature, Vol. 120, No. 1, 2001

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... This passage proves significant both as a Septuagintal addition to the book of Job and as a Hellenistic Jewish interpretation of Job. On the one hand, it represents one of several additions in LXX Job, including the speech of Job's wife in 2:9, the identification of his friends as kings in 2:11, and the assertion of his resurrection in 49:17a.4 The fact that this passage was appended to the Greek translation of Job may point to an attitude toward this text as not completely fixed in its written form."

Reed, Annette Y. Job as Jobab: The Interpretation of Job in LXX Job 42:17b–e (pp. 31-55) Journal of Biblical Literature, Vol. 120, No. 1, 2001

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.