Ezekiel 43:2

Hebrew Bible

1 Then he brought me to the gate that faced toward the east. 2 I saw the glory of the God of Israel coming from the east; the sound was like that of rushing water, and the earth radiated his glory. 3 It was like the vision I saw when he came to destroy the city, and the vision I saw by the Kebar River. I threw myself face down. 4 The glory of the Lord came into the temple by way of the gate that faces east. Source

Date: 6th Century B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

LXX Ezekiel 43:2

Septuagint

1 Moreover he brought me to the gate looking eastward, and led me forth. 2 And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came by the eastern way; and there was a voice of an army, as the sound of many redoubling their shouts, and the earth shone like light from the glory round about. 3 And the vision which I saw was like the vision which I saw when I went in to anoint the city: and the vision of the chariot which I saw was like the vision which I saw at the river Chobar; and I fell upon my face. 4 And the glory of the Lord came into the house, by the way of the gate looking eastward. Source

Date: 1st Century B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... Comparing MT and LXX Ezek 43:2-3, we immediately notice two points at which the LXX vorlage seems to have differed from MT, as well as what appears to be an expanded translation of midderek haqqadim in v 2, influenced by vv 1, 4. The translation of v 2b is also expanded; the purpose seems to be to link this passage with the original merkabah vision which concludes with a reference to he horasis tou phengous kyklothen ... More striking than these variations is LXX's expansion of v 3a ..."

Halperin, David J. Merkabah Midrash in the Septuagint (pp. 351-363) Journal of Biblical Literature, Vol. 101, No. 3, 1982

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... Comparing MT and LXX Ezek 43:2-3, we immediately notice two points at which the LXX vorlage seems to have differed from MT, as well as what appears to be an expanded translation of midderek haqqadim in v 2, influenced by vv 1, 4. The translation of v 2b is also expanded; the purpose seems to be to link this passage with the original merkabah vision which concludes with a reference to he horasis tou phengous kyklothen ... More striking than these variations is LXX's expansion of v 3a ..."

Halperin, David J. Merkabah Midrash in the Septuagint (pp. 351-363) Journal of Biblical Literature, Vol. 101, No. 3, 1982

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.