Daniel 4:34

Hebrew Bible

33 Now in that very moment this pronouncement about Nebuchadnezzar came true. He was driven from human society, he ate grass like oxen, and his body became damp with the dew of the sky, until his hair became long like an eagle’s feathers and his nails like a bird’s claws. 34 But at the end of the appointed time I, Nebuchadnezzar, looked up toward heaven, and my sanity returned to me. I extolled the Most High, and I praised and glorified the one who lives forever. For his authority is an everlasting authority, and his kingdom extends from one generation to the next. 35 All the inhabitants of the earth are regarded as nothing. He does as he wishes with the army of heaven and with those who inhabit the earth. No one slaps his hand and says to him, “What have you done?”

Tobit 13:1

Deuterocanon

1 Then Tobit said: "Blessed be God who lives forever, because his kingdom lasts throughout all ages. 2 For he afflicts, and he shows mercy; he leads down to Hades in the lowest regions of the earth, and he brings up from the great abyss, and there is nothing that can escape his hand. 3 Acknowledge him before the nations, O children of Israel; for he has scattered you among them. 4 He has shown you his greatness even there. Exalt him in the presence of every living being, because he is our Lord and he is our God; he is our Father and he is God forever.

 Notes and References

"... This prayer can almost be detached from the events and stand alone as a hymn to God. Some scholars see it as an independent composition inserted here; e.g. Zimmermann (1958: 24–25; 114) and Deselaers (1982: 42). See also Nickelsburg (1988: 801). It reflects the influence of Deut 31–32, where we have Moses’ final words to the people of Israel. Tobit’s prayer also addresses Jerusalem, and prays that the Temple will last forever. The prayer reflects the Deuteronomic view that God punishes for transgressions, but also is merciful ..."

Littman, Robert J. Tobit: The Book of Tobit in Codex Sinaiticus (p. 149) Brill, 2008

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