2 Kings 5:14

Hebrew Bible

12 The rivers of Damascus, the Abana and Pharpar, are better than any of the waters of Israel! Could I not wash in them and be healed?” So he turned around and went away angry. 13 His servants approached and said to him, “O master, if the prophet had told you to do some difficult task, you would have been willing to do it. It seems you should be happy that he simply said, ‘Wash and you will be healed.’” 14 So he went down and dipped in the Jordan seven times, as the prophet had instructed. His skin became as smooth as a young child’s and he was healed. 15 He and his entire entourage returned to the prophet. Naaman came and stood before him. He said, “For sure I know that there is no God in all the earth except in Israel! Now, please accept a gift from your servant.” 16 But Elisha replied, “As certainly as the Lord lives (whom I serve), I will take nothing from you.” Naaman insisted that he take it, but he refused. Source

Date: 6th Century B.C.E. (Final composition) (based on scholarly estimates)

Luke 7:10

New Testament

8 For I too am a man set under authority, with soldiers under me. I say to this one, ‘Go!’ and he goes, and to another, ‘Come!’ and he comes, and to my slave, ‘Do this!’ and he does it.” 9 When Jesus heard this, he was amazed at him. He turned and said to the crowd that followed him, “I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith!” 10 So when those who had been sent returned to the house, they found the slave well. 11 Soon afterward Jesus went to a town called Nain, and his disciples and a large crowd went with him. 12 As he approached the town gate, a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother (who was a widow), and a large crowd from the town was with her. Source

Date: 75-85 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... Appearing at the outset of Jesus' ministry, this scene identifies him as one who stands in the tradition of the prophets. That connection is reinforced in the healing stories. As Elisha had healed the Gentile Naaman, so Jesus heals the slave of a centurion (7:1-10, 2 Kings 5:1-14). The restoration of a widow's son recalls the healing of the son of the widow at Zarephath (7:11-17, 1 Kings 17:17-24)."

Gaventa, Beverly R. "Learning and Relearning the Identity of Jesus from Luke-Acts" in Gaventa, Beverly Roberts, and Richard B. Hays, ed. Seeking the Identity of Jesus: A Pilgrimage (p. 158) William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2008

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... Appearing at the outset of Jesus' ministry, this scene identifies him as one who stands in the tradition of the prophets. That connection is reinforced in the healing stories. As Elisha had healed the Gentile Naaman, so Jesus heals the slave of a centurion (7:1-10, 2 Kings 5:1-14). The restoration of a widow's son recalls the healing of the son of the widow at Zarephath (7:11-17, 1 Kings 17:17-24)."

Gaventa, Beverly R. "Learning and Relearning the Identity of Jesus from Luke-Acts" in Gaventa, Beverly Roberts, and Richard B. Hays, ed. Seeking the Identity of Jesus: A Pilgrimage (p. 158) William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2008

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.