2 Corinthians 1:17

New Testament

12 For our reason for confidence is this: The testimony of our conscience, that with pure motives and sincerity which are from God—not by human wisdom but by the grace of God—we conducted ourselves in the world, and all the more toward you. 13 For we do not write you anything other than what you can read and also understand. But I hope that you will understand completely 14 just as also you have partly understood us, that we are your source of pride just as you also are ours in the day of the Lord Jesus. 15 And with this confidence I intended to come to you first so that you would get a second opportunity to see us, 16 and through your help to go on into Macedonia and then from Macedonia to come back to you and be helped on our way into Judea by you. 17 Therefore when I was planning to do this, I did not do so without thinking about what I was doing, did I? Or do I make my plans according to mere human standards so that I would be saying both “Yes, yes” and “No, no” at the same time? Source

Date: 55-57 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

Bava Metzia 49a

Rabbinic (Babylonian Talmud)

The Gemara raises an objection: Rabbi Yosei, son of Rabbi Yehuda, says: What is the meaning when the verse states: “A just ephah, and a just hin, shall you have” (Leviticus 19:36)? But wasn’t a hin included in an ephah? Why is it necessary to state both? Rather, this is an allusion that serves to say to you that your yes [hen] should be just, and your no should be just. Apparently, it is a mitzva for one to fulfill his promises. Abaye says: That verse means that one should not say one matter with his mouth and think one other matter in his heart. It is prohibited for one to make a commitment that he has no intention of fulfilling. Rav Kahana made his commitment in good faith and reneged due to changed circumstances. That is not prohibited. Source

Date: 450-550 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

Welborn, L. L. Politics and Rhetoric in the Corinthian Epistles (pp. 164-165) Mercer University Press, 1997

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

Welborn, L. L. Politics and Rhetoric in the Corinthian Epistles (pp. 164-165) Mercer University Press, 1997

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.