1QSa 2

Dead Sea Scrolls (Community Rule)

And then [the Mess]iah of Israel shall [come], and the chiefs of the [clans of Israel] shall sit before him, [each] in the order of his dignity, according to [his place] in their camps and marches. And before them shall sit all the heads of [family of the congreg]ation, and the wise men of [the holy congregation,] each in the order of his dignity. And [when] they shall gather for the common [tab]le, to eat and [to drink] new wine, when the common table shall be set for eating and the new wine [poured] for drinking, let no man extend his hand over the firstfruits of bread and wine before the Priest; for [it is he] who shall bless the firstfruits of bread and wine, and shall be the first [to extend] his hand over the bread. Thereafter, the Messiah of Israel shall extend his hand over the bread, [and] all the congregation of the Community [shall utter a] blessing, [each man in the order] of his dignity. It is according to this statute that they shall proceed at every me[al at which] at least ten men are gathered together. Source

Date: 160 B.C.E. - 100 B.C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

John 2:2

New Testament

1 Now on the third day there was a wedding at Cana in Galilee. Jesus’ mother was there, 2 and Jesus and his disciples were also invited to the wedding. 3 When the wine ran out, Jesus’ mother said to him, “They have no wine left.” 4 Jesus replied, “Woman, why are you saying this to me? My time has not yet come.” 5 His mother told the servants, “Whatever he tells you, do it.” 6 Now there were six stone water jars there for Jewish ceremonial washing, each holding 20 or 30 gallons. 7 Jesus told the servants, “Fill the water jars with water.” So they filled them up to the very top. 8 Then he told them, “Now draw some out and take it to the head steward,” and they did. 9 When the head steward tasted the water that had been turned to wine, not knowing where it came from (though the servants who had drawn the water knew), he called the bridegroom 10 and said to him, “Everyone serves the good wine first, and then the cheaper wine when the guests are drunk. You have kept the good wine until now!” 11 Jesus did this as the first of his miraculous signs, in Cana of Galilee. In this way he revealed his glory, and his disciples believed in him. Source

Date: 90-110 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... The Johannine wedding banquet contains several intriguing points of conceptual comparison with the communal meal illustrated in 1QSa 2.11-22. First, in Jn 2.2, Jesus and his disciples are invited (or ‘called’) to a wedding banquet, while in 1QSa 2.11, 13, ‘the men of the name’ and ‘the priests’ are invited (or ‘called’) to the eschatological banquet. Secondly, ‘new wine’ plays a central role in both texts as a symbol of the coming messianic age (Jn 2.3, 9-10; cf. 1QSa 2.17-20). Thirdly, 1QSa 2 says four times that members of the community sit before the Priest ‘each one according to his own glory’ while in Jn 2.11 it is Jesus who reveals his own glory."

Cirafesi, Wally V. The Priestly Portrait of Jesus in the Gospel of John in Light of 1QS, 1QSa, and 1QSb (pp. 83-105) Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism, 2011

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... The Johannine wedding banquet contains several intriguing points of conceptual comparison with the communal meal illustrated in 1QSa 2.11-22. First, in Jn 2.2, Jesus and his disciples are invited (or ‘called’) to a wedding banquet, while in 1QSa 2.11, 13, ‘the men of the name’ and ‘the priests’ are invited (or ‘called’) to the eschatological banquet. Secondly, ‘new wine’ plays a central role in both texts as a symbol of the coming messianic age (Jn 2.3, 9-10; cf. 1QSa 2.17-20). Thirdly, 1QSa 2 says four times that members of the community sit before the Priest ‘each one according to his own glory’ while in Jn 2.11 it is Jesus who reveals his own glory."

Cirafesi, Wally V. The Priestly Portrait of Jesus in the Gospel of John in Light of 1QS, 1QSa, and 1QSb (pp. 83-105) Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism, 2011

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.