1 Kings 17:22

Hebrew Bible

20 Then he called out to the Lord, “O Lord, my God, are you also bringing disaster on this widow I am staying with by killing her son?21 He stretched out over the boy three times and called out to the Lord, “O Lord, my God, please let this boy’s breath return to him.” 22 The Lord answered Elijah’s prayer; the boy’s breath returned to him and he lived. 23 Elijah took the boy, brought him down from the upper room to the house, and handed him to his mother. Elijah then said, “See, your son is alive!” 24 The woman said to Elijah, “Now I know that you are a prophet and that the Lord’s message really does come through you.” Source

Date: 6th Century B.C.E. (Final composition) (based on scholarly estimates)

Luke 7:14

New Testament

12 As he approached the town gate, a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother (who was a widow), and a large crowd from the town was with her. 13 When the Lord saw her, he had compassion for her and said to her, “Do not weep.” 14 Then he came up and touched the bier, and those who carried it stood still. He said, “Young man, I say to you, get up!” 15 So the dead man sat up and began to speak, and Jesus gave him back to his mother. 16 Fear seized them all, and they began to glorify God, saying, “A great prophet has appeared among us!” and “God has come to help his people!” Source

Date: 75-85 C.E. (based on scholarly estimates)

"... Appearing at the outset of Jesus' ministry, this scene identifies him as one who stands in the tradition of the prophets. That connection is reinforced in the healing stories. As Elisha had healed the Gentile Naaman, so Jesus heals the slave of a centurion (7:1-10, 2 Kings 5:1-14). The restoration of a widow's son recalls the healing of the son of the widow at Zarephath (7:11-17, 1 Kings 17:17-24)."

Gaventa, Beverly R. "Learning and Relearning the Identity of Jesus from Luke-Acts" in Gaventa, Beverly Roberts, and Richard B. Hays, ed. Seeking the Identity of Jesus: A Pilgrimage (p. 158) William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2008

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.

"... Appearing at the outset of Jesus' ministry, this scene identifies him as one who stands in the tradition of the prophets. That connection is reinforced in the healing stories. As Elisha had healed the Gentile Naaman, so Jesus heals the slave of a centurion (7:1-10, 2 Kings 5:1-14). The restoration of a widow's son recalls the healing of the son of the widow at Zarephath (7:11-17, 1 Kings 17:17-24)."

Gaventa, Beverly R. "Learning and Relearning the Identity of Jesus from Luke-Acts" in Gaventa, Beverly Roberts, and Richard B. Hays, ed. Seeking the Identity of Jesus: A Pilgrimage (p. 158) William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2008

* The use of references are not endorsements of their contents. Please read the entirety of the provided reference(s) to understand the author's full intentions regarding the use of these texts.