LXX Isaiah 9:2

Septuagint

1 Do this first; do it quickly, O country of Zaboulon, the land of Nephthalime, and the rest who inhabit the seashore and beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the nations, the parts of Judea. 2 O you people who walk in darkness, see a great light! O you who live in the country and in the shadow of death, light will shine on you! 3 Most of the people, whom you have brought back in your joy, will also rejoice before you like those who rejoice at the harvest and in the same way as those who divide plunder, 4 because the yoke placed on them will be taken away, and the rod that is on their neck; for the Lord has scattered the rod of the exactors as on the day that was upon Madiam,

Matthew 4:16

New Testament

14 so that what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah would be fulfilled: 15 “Land of Zebulun and land of Naphtali, the way by the sea, beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles— 16 the people who sit in darkness have seen a great light, and on those who sit in the region and shadow of death a light has dawned.” 17 From that time Jesus began to preach this message: “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is near!” 18 As he was walking by the Sea of Galilee he saw two brothers, Simon (called Peter) and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea (for they were fishermen).

 Notes and References

"... Matthew 4:16 also differs from the LXX version of Isa 9:2. Matthew 4:16 containsκαθήμενος instead of πορευόμενος. According to the LXX, the people are “walking” in darkness. In Matt 4:16, the people are “sitting” in darkness. Matthew 4:16 also uses the indicative form of ὁράω, εἶδεν, instead of the imperative ἴδετε. Matthew’s version just reports that the people in darkness saw a great light. The LXX commands them to see a great light. Like Matthew, 1QIsa, and the MT state that the people saw (ראו) a great light. So, Matt 4:16 resembles 1QIsa and the MT more than the LXX by using the indicative form of ὁράω ..."

Winchester, Christopher Thematic Association in the Gospel of Matthew: Situating Exegesis in the Gospel of Matthew in its Second Temple Context (p. 223) University of Edinburgh, 2017

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